Category Archives: Green Movies

La Mission Opens the 6th Annual Artivist Film Festival In Hollywood


The 6th Annual Artivist Film Festival opened this week in Hollywood bringing together films and audiences to raise awareness humanity, animals and the environment through activism.

This year the festival starts with eco-friendly and powerfull movie La Mission starring Benjamin Bratt and Jeremy Ray Valdez, directed and written by Peter Bratt. The film takes us to the heart of the Mission District in San Francisco as we follow the story of Che, his son Jesse, the new neighbor next door and the “Mission Boyz”, through a whirlwind of social issues.

With the help of Reel Green Media, La Mission was an eco-friendly set, from waste diversion to no water bottles and of course, green product placement.

The Artivist Film Festival takes place between December 1-5 at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood and will screen more than 40 short and feature films from around the globe. For more information, visit the official site here.

– ARTIVIST: is a unique word for Advocate Artists.
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The films most likely to “save the world” in a minute


Watch this, it only takes 1 minute! You can say a lot in 1 minute, and hopefully save the world while you’re at it. 1minutetosavetheworld.com is an international short film competition on climate change.

Amongst judges were Franny Armstrong (director of The Age of Stupid), Bruce Parry (presenter of TV’s Tribe), Mark Lynas (author of Six Degrees) and Shekhar Kapur (director of Elizabeth)

The competition was backed by Greenpeace, Unite for Climate, World Development Movement and nef (new economics foundation).

A paper boat, talking cats and a polar bear playing video games were yesterday voted as the best short films likely to “save the worl in a minute.”

The winning films will be shown later this year at the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, with the overall winner receiving a handy £1,000.

Below are four of the category winners, including the overall best film, Paper Boat by Arun Rose.

Who gets your vote?

Best Film – Paper Boat

Runner-up – Bear in mind

Best film by a professional – When I am 18

Best youth film – Stop global war-ming

Best viral film – Cats against climate change

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Are there any “green” horror movies ?

We already know about eco-disaster movies, eco-friendly movies for children or simply documentaries about the environment and ecology.

However has anyone ever heard of green horror movies?

In the following extract taken from Mother Nature Network website, eco-blogger, Matt Hickman, Talks about “eco-horror films out there that hopefully won’t make your stomach churn or leave you too scared to take out the recycling after 10 p.m.” :

A warning: You won’t find any deep environmental messages aside from “be nice to Mother Nature or else …” in these movies although some are more serious than others. I’m a bit of a scary movie nut myself so I’m glad to make a few recommendations.

“Animals gone bad” films may be a good place to start if you’re weary of anything involving the supernatural or serial killers. Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds is a staple in the genre and still flat-out terrifying. I saw it at a young age and it stayed with me. So long in fact, that last year when I was on a road trip along the California coast with friends, we stopped at a gas station for a bathroom break in Bodega Bay and I refused to get out of the car in fear of an avian attack.Arachnophobia is also a classic sure to make your skin crawl and we mustn’t forget Jaws although a more recent scary shark flick, Open Water, gave me an in-theater panic attack. One of the better murderous animal films I’ve seen recently was Rogue about a bloodthirsty Aussie croc, but if you’re looking for old-school camp, try Day of the AnimalsAnd if you’re curious about the dangers of genetic engineering, watch Jurassic Park.

Moving on from fauna to flora, murderous, possessed trees always give me the chills because, well, I don’t really expect it. Watch The Evil Dead or Poltergeist if you want to have nightmares about Douglas firs. And while we’re on the homicidal plant tip, two films, The Ruins and The Happening, will have you keeping a distance from your houseplants for at least a week.

On the more-creepy-than-scary list is one of my favorite cult flicks, The Wicker Man (the original, not the so-bad-it’s-funny Nic Cage remake). In short, it’s about what happens when a group of sexed-up Scottish pagans are let down by Mother Nature. What happens? Well, I’ll let you find out.

To continue reading the article follow this link

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Children and environmental movies

wall-e

As we become more and more passionate about the environment, perhapse the most important thing is to instill those same priorities in children and the most exciting and fun way to do that is to share the love of movies.

Indeed, what better way to educate a child to be respectful towards the world that surrounds him than through cartoons with loveable characters and an interesting story.

Wall-E (2008) and Happy Feet (2006) are examples of environmental movies for children that were both popular and provoked debate amongst the public.

One the one hand, picture the planet without people, without plants, without life of any sort, save a small sized trash compacting robot and a whole lot of trash. This is opening scene of Pixar’s Wall-E (2008).

The story of a little robot that manages to make it to outer space, find love and at the same time the means to save our dying Earth – all in a hard day’s work.

While what’s left of the humanity have turned into robots or rather slugs, orbiting space indefinitely because the earth is inhabitable.

Carried in floating chairs so they don’t have to walk, doing nothing but drink food from a cup and stare at the tv screen they are permanently attached to.

happy feet

On the other hand, animated drama/comedy Happy Feet depicts the life of free penguins in the Antarctica versus being trapped in a marine park exhibit.

Although director George Miller insists the story didn’t start off as an environmental message, he said: “In Australia, we’re very, very aware of the ozone hole and Antarctica is literally the canary in the coal mine for this stuff. So it sort of had to go in that direction.”

With a final taking of approximatively $198 million in the United States alone, about eight times the figure for the much-discussed Al Gore documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth” environmentalists said “Happy Feet” provided a rare chance to spread their messages on global warming, overfishing, and the dangers of oil spills to an audience that doesn’t usually follow public policy.

“The generation that will be seeing this movie, the children, will be the ones facing the critical issues when the big problems are going to happen – possible global fish extinction in 40 to 50 years” for many species, said Matt Rand, director of the marine fish campaign at National Environmental Trust, a Washington-based advocacy group.

With takings of $224 millions in the USA only, Wall- E was an even bigger box-office hit. The movie became a real player in the environmental discussion.

Thanks to it children were interested by what was going on and started asking questions about how we should prevent the apocalyptical vision of the Earth we see in the animated movie. At the end Wall-E became a real learning tool, disguised as a fun, simple love story.

Svetlana Loschatova, mother of 9 year old Yvan said: “After walking out of the movie theater my 9 year old who obviously totally enjoyed the movie said: that was made to teach humans a lesson. I of course pushed him a little further and he explained, we can’t keep being mean to the Earth.”

So let’s hope that there are more environmental friendly movies for kids to come!

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Greenpeace Story Being Turned Into Major Motion Picture

greenpeace
National’s Treasure director Jon Turteltaub and Naked Gun‘s producer Jerry Zucker will team up behind a new film detailing the birth of the environmental organization Greenpeace.

According to the Guardian, the story will be told through the eyes of Greenpeace’s charismatic founders, Bob Hunter and Rex Weyler.

“We want to look at these unlikely heroes who became activists in spite of themselves,” Janet Zucker (one of the producers) told Variety

“Jon likes to make a big adventure movies. And we’ve found that the best way to reach people’s hearts and minds is through entertainment.”

The title of the movie is yet to be determined.

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The Cove

Using state-of-the-art equipment, a group of activists, led by renown dolphin trainer Ric O’Barry, infiltrate a cove near Taijii, Japan to expose both a shocking instance of animal abuse and a serious threat to human health.

O’Barry joins forces with filmmaker Louis Psihoyos and the Oceanic Preservation Society to get to the truth of what’s really going on in the cove and why it matters to everyone in the world.

They will recruit an “Ocean’s Eleven”-style team of underwater sound and camera experts, special effects artists, marine explorers, adrenaline junkies and world-class free divers who will carry out an undercover operation to photograph the off-limits cove.

The result is a provocative mix of investigative journalism, eco-adventure and arresting imagery that adds up to an urgent plea for hope.

While certain images in The Cove are hard to view (dolphin slaughter is not for the faint-hearted), the movie is more about the mission to capture footage of the slaughter than about the slaughter itself.

If the filmmakers can shoot quality images of what happens in Taiji, they can use the footage as evidence of what occurs there, and hopefully convince the international community to put a stop to the slaughter.

The Cove is about the brutal trapping, capture and slaughter of dolphins, but it’s also about politics and the ghastly effect our industrialized world has had on the ocean’s creatures, it teaches us about mercury poisoning, over-fishing, whaling laws and the world of animals-as-entertainment.

thecove

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The Age of Stupid – the world’s most ecofriendly premiere

The Age of Stupid

For the release of her film The Age of Stupid Franny Armstrong insisted on the premiere being a ‘0-footprint’ affair.
Indeed, big names like Vivienne Westwood turned up on a bicycle, rickshaw and electric car rather than in a limo.

The cinema was powered by the sun, and the usually luxurious red carpet replaced by one that is green and fashioned from recycled bottles.

The premiere of the film, which sees Postlethwaite play a man living in 2055 looking back at footage from the present day and considering why humanity did not save itself from climate change, was also broadcast at over 60 cinemas and venues across the UK.

All of the profits from the event are set to go towards the Not Stupid campaign, which has been created to raise awareness of climate change in the run-up to December’s major summit on the topic in Copenhagen.

With over 16,000 film fans attending the live screening of the premiere across the UK, and Guiness Book of World Records confirming The Age of Stupid screening as the largest ever film premiere, filmmakers succeeded where other climate change films have failed – the “earnest” 11th Hour , which featured Leonardo DiCaprio, and Al Gore’s lecture, An Inconvenient Truth — to galvanise cinema-goers into action.

As the environment begins to hit our news pages more and more, we must consider the changes, choices and approaches to creative output, this premiere shows us that it’s actually possible to launch the largest film premiere without making any “footprint” on our planet.

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